<div dir="ltr"><div class="gmail_extra"><div class="gmail_quote">On 18 February 2014 01:53, Toby Corkindale <span dir="ltr"><<a href="mailto:toby.corkindale@strategicdata.com.au" target="_blank">toby.corkindale@strategicdata.com.au</a>></span> wrote:<br>
<blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0px 0px 0px 0.8ex;border-left-width:1px;border-left-color:rgb(204,204,204);border-left-style:solid;padding-left:1ex">You get somewhat better quality modules if you use one of the Perl web stacks, Dancer, Catalyst, etc. However, even the standard session stores for Catalyst::Session::Store (File and DBI/DBIC) don't do automatic expiry as far as I can tell. (I didn't investigate Dancer or Mojolicious)<br>
</blockquote><div><br></div><div>You should have in investigated Mojo :)</div><div><br></div><div>It uses client based sessions, so the session data is stored on the client encrypted and signed to prevent tampering. No database required.</div>
<div><br></div><div><a href="http://mojolicio.us/perldoc/Mojolicious/Guides/Growing#Sessions">http://mojolicio.us/perldoc/Mojolicious/Guides/Growing#Sessions</a><br></div><div><br></div><div>You can expire a session as you would usually by setting the cookies expires attribute. Can be modified by the client, but you encode the expiry date in the session too (encrypted and signed, remember), or you could even change the "secret" in the application every so often to make it even more secure.</div>
<div><br></div><div>Whether you trust it or not is a different matter though.</div><div><br></div><div>Ben</div></div></div></div>